Recent writing: Mental Health Awareness Week 2017

This week has been Mental Health Awareness Week, an annual event organised by the Mental Health Foundation. It’s a great week for getting friends, family, celebrities and politicians talking more about mental health – particularly in the run-up to a General Election! But it can also feel a bit tokenistic, because we desperately need to get better at having these conversations, and actually converting them into actions, all year round.

The theme for this year’s MHAW was ‘surviving or thriving’. I’ve written articles for NetDoctor, Sebastian & Millicent, The Debrief, and Mental Health Today, exploring what it means to thrive with mental health problems.

Is anxiety sabotaging your career? – for NetDoctor:

Mental health problems affect one in six employees in the UK, and work-related stress is the number one health and safety concern for 70 per cent of businesses. Yet, for employees suffering from anxiety, a lack of support at work too often means lowering their ambitions to fit in with their emotional needs.

35-year-old Unite representative Tom* works as a telesales advisor for an energy company, and believes that his long-term anxiety has “held me back from applying for higher roles in the business, as management don’t really understand mental health.” More recently, he adds, “I have been off work due to the severity of my anxiety, and instead of being supportive they are over-riding my fit notes and taking me through disciplinary procedures to sack me.”

Continue reading at NetDoctor…

Is There Life After SSRIs? – for The Debrief:

More of us than ever are on antidepressants. Doctors in England wrote out more than 64 million prescriptions for them last year, and use of antidepressants is now seven times higher than 25 years ago, in 1991. The most widely used antidepressants are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like fluoxetine (aka Prozac), sertraline and citalopram, which act on your levels of mood stabilising neurotransmitter serotonin.

Some people need antidepressants and anyone who has a problem with that should get over it, stat. There is no shame in taking antidepressants and for many people, they are life-changing. There is no ‘one-size fits all’ treatment when it comes to depression. But, with so many of us taking these pills as part of our normal daily routine, it’s worth asking whether there can be life after SSRIs, in which it’s possible not just to survive, but to actually thrive? We spoke to three women who’ve been there, plus Dr Mark Salter from the Royal College of Psychiatrists and mindset coach Ebonie Allard, to find out.

Continue reading at The Debrief…

The troubled mind of fashion – for Sebastian and Millicent:

How much does what you wear say about you? Anecdotally, we all know there’s some kind of link between how we feel and what we wear. Who hasn’t spent whole days in their pyjamas, or a tracksuit, while feeling stressed, burnt out, or depressed? Not to mention the burst of confidence and self-esteem that comes from pulling on your best outfit and leaving the house looking a million dollars. In recent years, scientific research has confirmed what many of us already knew: how we feel affects what we choose to wear, and what we wear affects how we feel.

Continue reading at Sebastian and Millicent…

Using art therapy to thrive – for Mental Health Today:

“Writing and performing gives me the freedom to speak clearly, and the power to make my audiences listen,” says 45-year-old Ugandan refugee Jade.

Jade is involved with writing and drama groups run by the charities Freedom from Torture and Women for Refugee Women. For her, creativity, humour, and community have been crucial elements of her journey towards healing from the traumas she suffered back home.

“It’s very therapeutic to have that time with friends, writing together, listening and supporting each other,” Jade says. “I write a lot of poems and short stories now, but I always try and write something that will make people laugh. If I dwell on what happened to me, those people will have won.”

Continue reading at Mental Health Today…

The dark side of meditation – for Sebastian and Millicent:

The ancient eastern practice of meditation and mindfulness has been around for thousands of years, but far more recently exploded into prominence in the western world. It’s now rare to go a week without hearing or reading about the much-celebrated wellbeing benefits of taking time each day to focus on your breath and the sensations of your body, and enjoy simply ‘being’ in the moment. A key component of mindful meditation is the idea of noticing the small pleasures in life, and habitually bringing your wandering thoughts back to focus on your present situation.

Continue reading at Sebastian and Millicent…


IF YOU NEED SUPPORT

Please note that I am NOT a psychologist or healthcare professional. If you are struggling with mental health problems, contact Mind on 0300 123 3393 or Rethink Mental Health on 0300 5000 927. In a crisis, call the free, 24/7 Samaritans helpline on 116 123.

However, if you would like to get in touch about your own experiences, or a story that you’re keen to tell, please feel free to drop me an email.

Leave a Reply