World Mental Health Day: Perfectionism, financial anxiety, and what it’s really like to be sectioned

Today, 10 October, is World Mental Health Day. This year’s WMHD has a theme of workplace wellbeing, and also sees the launch of Natasha Devon’s latest campaign, The Mental Health Media Charter, which I’m proud to support.

Here are a few of my recent articles on mental health – exploring perfectionism, the anxieties around financial uncertainty, and what it’s really like to be sectioned…

Following on from my MHT article on the Mental Health Act, in September I wrote for NetDoctor about what it’s really like to be sectioned as a psychiatric patient under the Act. Many thanks to Andrea, Kate and Alika for speaking to me so candidly about their experiences, and to Rethink Mental Illness for connecting us.

For The Debrief, I wrote about a recent study into perfectionism as a risk factor for suicide. Perfectionism is particularly associated with young, high achieving women, so I looked into the impact it can have on mental health – from anxiety and depression to eating disorders and OCD. Thank you to self-confessed perfectionists Lizzie and Sam (not her real name) for chatting to me, and to psychologist Dr Nihara Krause, who shared her expertise in clinical perfectionism.

Finally, I wrote for Nationwide Building Society about the links between money trouble and mental health problems, and what customers can do to tackle financial anxiety.

This is what it’s really like to be sectioned – for NetDoctor:

Mental Health Act

Mental health is on the agenda more than ever before. While there’s still plenty of work to be done, many of us now feel increasingly comfortable talking about common issues like mild to moderate depression and anxiety, and their impact on our everyday lives. But more complex and severe mental health conditions remain heavily stigmatised, particularly when they involve patients being detained and forcibly treated under the Mental Health Act – known as sectioning.

47-year-old Canadian Andrea has a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, and has been sectioned several times since moving to the UK when she was 23. The first time, she recalls: “I had been given antidepressants, ignoring the fact that a proportion of us with bipolar cannot take antidepressants. I became psychotic within 48 hours.”

Continue reading at NetDoctor…

Is Your Perfectionism Affecting Your Mental Health? – for The Debrief:

‘Perfectionism affects every aspect of my life in some way or another. I have to be perfect in every way, shape or form,’ says 23-year-old Sam*. ‘I set very high standards for myself, and if I don’t reach them – which 99 percent of the time I don’t because they’re impossible – I then attack and belittle myself over it.’

Sound familiar? Perfectionism can affect anyone, but it’s particularly associated with young, high-achieving women – whether it’s a constant need to look flawless, or staying hours late at the office to tinker with that one piece of work that’s not quite spot-on.

We might think of it as a fairly harmless personality quirk – just ‘being a bit anal’ – but perfectionism can actually have a pretty sinister impact on your long-term mental health. The Journal of Personality recently published the most comprehensive study of its kind into perfectionism as a risk factor for suicide, concluding that ‘self-generated and socially based pressures to be perfect’ make people more susceptible to suicidal thoughts.

How to cope with financial anxiety – for Nationwide Building Society:

For a long time, mental health has been associated with serious, long-term mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. But we all have mental health, and it’s affected constantly by the pleasures and stresses of everyday life, from money and work, to family and relationships.

Financial uncertainty – whether it’s the threat of redundancy, or an out of control debt – can take a huge toll on your mental health, leading to common issues like stress, depression and anxiety.

The impact of this can be huge, not only on your personal and family life, but also on your career. Work-related stress accounts for 45% of all working days lost to illness (This link will open in a new window) in the UK – and struggling at work is a sure-fire way to sink into the vicious cycle of financial anxiety.

But there are simple, practical steps you can take to cope with financial anxiety and regain a sense of control.

Continue reading at Nationwide…


IF YOU NEED SUPPORT

Please note that I am NOT a psychologist or healthcare professional. If you are struggling with mental health problems, contact Mind on 0300 123 3393 or Rethink Mental Health on 0300 5000 927. In a crisis, call the free, 24/7 Samaritans helpline on 116 123.

However, if you would like to get in touch about your own experiences, or a story that you’re keen to tell, please feel free to drop me an email.

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