Recent writing: Egg freezing, and periods on the pill

A couple more sexual/reproductive health pieces from last month. My latest for Grazia Daily looked at everything you need to know about egg freezing – from the cost and success rates, to the risks involved. September also saw my first three commissions for online teen girls’ mag betty.me, including an article on everything you need to know about how going on the pill affects your periods.

What Is Egg Freezing? – for Grazia Daily:

Egg freezing, or cryopreservation, is a fertility treatment used to collect, preserve and store a woman’s eggs, so they can be used to make a baby later on in her life. It was originally developed for women with certain medical conditions, or who are undergoing particular treatments (such as chemotherapy), which can damage your natural fertility. By freezing their eggs before treatment, patients have the opportunity to try for a family once they’ve fully recovered from their condition.

These days, ‘elective’ or ‘social’ egg freezing is also increasingly used for lifestyle reasons, if a woman isn’t ready to have children straight away but wants to keep her fertility options open for the future. Fertility naturally begins to decline around the age of 35, so having your eggs frozen while you’re young means they’re better quality and could help prolong your fertility if you plan on starting your family at a slightly older age.

6 things you need to know about periods on the pill – for Betty:

Gone on the pill because your skin is playing up, or your periods are reaaaaally heavy? It can be a bit of a lifesaver, tbh. But if you’ve still got a load of questions about how it affects your body, or what happens to your monthly flow when you’re taking it, look no further. Here’s everything you NTK…

The pill stops you ovulating

The most common way the pill works is by stopping your ovaries from releasing an egg (ovulation). You’ll probably remember from biology that periods happen each month if an egg is released but not fertilised, so when the pill stops your ovaries from releasing an egg each month, it technically means you don’t get periods at all.

There’s usually still a bleed though (sorry!)

Even though you don’t get a real period, you’ll still experience monthly bleeding that’s similar to having your period.

Continue reading at Betty…

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