Recent writing: fertility myths, and women’s cancers

September was Gynaecological Cancer Awareness Month, and I wrote for Patient about how to spot the warning signs of the five different gynae cancers: ovarian, cervical, womb, vaginal and vulval cancer. Also in September I wrote for Grazia, debunking some of the most common myths around fertility.

For Breast Cancer Awareness Month, in October, I worked with both Breast Cancer Care and Breast Cancer Now on two features – for Patient and BBC Three – about two women’s experiences of living with secondary breast cancer. Special thanks to Emily and Beth for speaking so candidly about such a difficult subject.

How to spot the warning signs of gynaecological cancer – for Patient:

More than 21,000 women are diagnosed with a gynaecological cancer each year in the UK, but how many of the types and symptoms could you actually name?

This September, for Gynaecological Cancer Awareness Month, charity The Eve Appeal is calling for cancer education to become part of the Relationships, Sex and Health Education curriculum in schools. Knowledge of gynaecological anatomy, and awareness of gynaecological cancer symptoms, are crucial to early detection and treatment. If you’re feeling clueless, here’s the charity’s Ask Eve nurse Tracie Miles with your need-to-know guide.

9 Common Fertility Myths Unpicked – for Grazia:

Fertility. Of all the ‘F words’ out there, it’s by far the most frustrating – not to mention baffling. You spend more than a decade of your fertile life trying desperately not to get pregnant and then, as your 35th birthday edges ever closer, it all gets very complicated. When should I start trying? How long should it take? How can I improve my chances?

The simple answer is that there are no simple answers. Everyone’s different, and there’s no exact science when it comes to fertility.

But there are some pretty unhelpful myths out there that don’t make matters any clearer. And some of them are so widespread you might even have heard them from your GP – never mind what you’ve been told by your impatient mother-in-law, your best friend, and all those frantic Google searches.

Continue reading at Grazia…

How to cope with metastatic breast cancer – for Patient:

As part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 13 October is Secondary Breast Cancer Awareness Day – which this year is all the more poignant as it falls just six weeks after 40-year-old You, Me and The Big C podcaster Rachael Bland died from the condition.

Metastatic, or secondary, breast cancer is a devastating diagnosis that can turn women’s lives upside down and leave them and their families facing an uncertain future. We spoke to blogger Emma and charity Breast Cancer Care about how to cope when you find out your breast cancer has spread.

‘I was diagnosed with incurable breast cancer when I was 22…’ – for BBC Three:

By Beth Brown, as told to Sarah Graham

My daughter Amelia was 18 months old when I first noticed something wasn’t right. It wasn’t a lump or one of the classic signs you think of, more like a hardening on the skin at the top of my breast. But with a toddler to care for and our wedding coming up, I had other things on my mind. Everything else seemed fine, so I pushed it away, got on with life and didn’t go to the doctor until after my wedding – a few months later.

Even when I went to hospital for scans and tests, I didn’t think it was going to come back as cancer. The thought didn’t even enter my mind. I expected it to be a cyst or something easy to treat – that they’d remove whatever it was and we’d go back to our normal family life.

But the longer I was at the hospital, the more I started to think something wasn’t right. I kept seeing other women coming in, having their tests done and going again within an hour or so – while I was there for about eight hours, having test after test.

When they finally sat me down and told me it was cancer, I was really shocked. I gripped my husband’s hand in panic, my mind racing. Weeks earlier we’d been so happy, celebrating our wedding, planning for the future. And now this. As soon as you hear the C-word, you immediately start thinking the worst. More than anything I couldn’t stop thinking, ‘but what about Amelia?’. I was terrified, and it just felt so unfair.


IF YOU NEED SUPPORT

Please note that I am NOT a psychologist or healthcare professional. Check out my resources page for details of organisations who might be able to help.

If you are struggling with mental health problems, contact Mind on 0300 123 3393 or Rethink Mental Health on 0300 5000 927. In a crisis, call the free, 24/7 Samaritans helpline on 116 123.

However, if you would like to get in touch about your own experiences, or a story that you’re keen to tell, please feel free to drop me an email.

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